Archive for the ‘handmade’ Category

clever and pretty

July 28, 2014

 

 

found on The Jealous Curator curated contemporary art  Camilla Engman.

art journaling for kids

April 18, 2014

art journalling by Tammy Garica Tammy Garcia runs this great website about art journaling. If you don’t know how to get started or want to get inspired, go to Daisy Yellow. Tammy provides tons of ideas, tutorials and prompts. Here are two articles  Art Journaling for Kids|Tweens|Teens  and Art Journaling 101

a collage a day keeps the apple at bay

April 17, 2014

A collage a day keeps the apple at bay. I am a big fan of Martin O’Neills collage work. Here is his website: http://cutitout.co.uk/ He did an illustration series for the Guardian a few years ago, and I bought every issue just for the illustrations.

paper works by Joanne Hummel Newell

April 10, 2014

pocket-museum_pencil-watercolour-and-collage_51cmx51cmhyper-planepop-up-book_collageephemerapencil_40cmx30cmx20cmbird-and-eggs_paper-and-found-objects_2010_35x15x15cm

Nice  work  by Joanne Hummel Newell.

handmade tribal pictogram book

April 8, 2014

Do! A Minimalist Handmade Pictogram Book in the Style of Indian Tribal Art

This book published by Tara  Books combines so many things I am fond of such as 1) Indian tribal painting, 2) children’s books, 3) pictograms, 4) screen printing – all wrapped into one. So I just added a new category to my blog: a wish list!

Tara is an Indian publisher producing beautiful handmade books. Watch the hand production process of this book here:

via  Brain Pickings.

mark making

April 6, 2014

Very nice video on the fascination of mark making – what applies to children may also apply to adults and even the elderly. (I fixed the broken link.)

the forest of signs

April 1, 2014

found here: The Forest of Signs (Budding Artists – Detail) 2008.

The Forest of Signs (Apple Record) 2008 

The Forest of Signs (Brake) 2008 

 

life is simple

September 30, 2012

 

Christine Tarantino/Words Of Light Mail Art: Artist Booksopen editions 

Book art by Christine Tarrantino

color pencils

August 30, 2012

“Colour Pencils” by Jonna Pohjalainen on environmentalart.net via Handmade Charlotte.

This cheers me up immensely.

paper friends

August 30, 2012

collage : blancahelga.com.

Autorretrato | Flickr .

Libro de poemas de Carlos Ramos | Flickr – Photo Sharing!.

I like the strange collages by Blanca Helga. There is a lot more of her work to see on her website and also on Flickr. She sells her Paper Friends on Etsy.

artful doodles

August 28, 2012

 

ingriddijkers.blogspot.co.at
Apparently doodling is evolving into a meditation practice called zentangle.

a river of words

August 24, 2012

Poetry River Craft | Made by Joel.

And many more lovely and inspiring ideas for making simple toys, printables and more by Joel.

stitches

August 21, 2012

more by Lauren DiCioccio  via Obsolete Embroidery / Handmade Charlotte.

handstitched postcard

August 20, 2012

Handstitched Postcard via Handmade Charlotte.

cross-stitched books

August 19, 2012

Lauren DiCioccio : Objects : cross-stitched books.

hand lettering

August 13, 2012

Getting Messy With Ms. Jessi.

Here is another creative project for children, creating illustrations fo all the letters of the alphabet, with handprints. The thumbnails are a bit small but if you click on the image they will enlarge a little bit more.

baby words

August 10, 2012

A simple and sweet idea: Rainer Hoffelner created a notebook with mostly blank pages to serve as “baby dictionary.” It is meant to be used by parents for tracking the development of their child’s language and recording original and funny expressions. It must be fun to read this book together with the child once she starts getting interested in reading and writing, talking about how much she has already learned. The child could then start noting down words by herself. Published by Langenscheidt, Germany’s most prominent publisher of dictionaries.

isotype & literacy learning box

August 10, 2012



Sometimes I create teaching materials for primary school children. Usually they are in German, so not very interesting for this blog here. But this picture domino can be understood and used by all people who know the story of Little Red Riding Hood. The domino follows the events in the fairy tale, based on the Grimm version. The idea is, that every child has to narrate the next bit of the story, before they put the next domino piece down. Sometimes essential details have to be filled in such as the wolf devouring grandma and the little girl, but these story elements will rarely be left out anyway. So it is an exercise in sequencing and story telling. But I think it could be fun for grown ups too.

The graphics used are mostly from http://www.thenounproject.com or in the public domain. These images have been designed in the tradition of ISOTYPE and other signs, which are forming an international visual language in their own right. (Think of the signage on airports or the Olympics.) The image of Red Riding Hood is by Emma Pelling and can be found among many other educational resources at http://www.earlylearninghq.org.uk.

I am very much interested in developing Isotype-like icons for children, to be used in the context of literacy, or rather for developing multimodal literacy. I believe that abstracted and well crafted icons can be a stepping stone to alphabetic reading, as the reader has to make inferences. They also could help to communicate very efficiently to children of all languages, for example, in games or websites or other places. Of course this is happening already to some extent – children learn to read emoticons, icons and symbols in contextual menus of games. But I am sure there is more to be achieved.

The pdf is in German. The last page is meant to be a cover for a DVD storage box. I have been thinking a long time about the most practical and efficient way to store and organize learning games in the classroom. I have come to the conclusion that empty DVD covers without the DVD tray are the most simple and elegant solution. They can be stored on a bookshelf, next to books or with other DVDs, so they can be associated with both books and games. This way they can be easily retrieved and put back to where they belong. They are cheap. The boxes shut tightly, so hopefully cards and small game tokens will not be lost too quickly. The instructions can be written on the back cover and as they are protected, they will not be lost or torn. Where appropriate, a booklet or a game plan can be included (often DVD covers have little clips to hold the booklet down). For example, the story of Red Riding Hood could be provided with this game.

I am happy to borrow, steal and promote good teaching ideas and ideas for classroom organization from wherever they come from. However, I claim to be the first to use DVD covers for literacy learning boxes! Here is the printable pdf. You are free to use it. CC: BY-NC-SA

ROTKÄPPCHEN ERZÄHLDOMINO

summer snowflakes

August 6, 2012

How Do You Cut Your Snowflakes?.

I don’t know why I am posting about these winter themes in the middle of summer. Well, I guess I have had very little time for blogging this year and so there is a backlog. Anyway, this is a lovely idea for a simple project, cutting snowflakes out of junk mail by Michele Pacey.

white out poem

August 6, 2012

Ich male mir den Winter by Lena 9 – Collage

This is such a sweet project from a primary school in Germany. The children used a poem  about winter by Josef Guggenmos as inspiration. A copy of the poem was glued onto a piece of paper and painted over with water colours. The poem was partially covered with opaque white. It gives the impression of snow softly covering the poem. The children only left those words and sentences they liked in particular. This reminds me of Austin Kleon’s blackout poems, these, in contrast are whiteout poems.  You can see the entire series here: “Ich male mir den Winter”

Dick and Jane

January 6, 2012

Innuendo Set | Flickr – Photo Sharing!.

These Artist Trading Cards have been made by StephanieCake apparently using pictures from a 1960’s hairstying book and the words are from a 1930’s children’s reading primer. I have been researching reading primers and so I find these very funny.

 


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