Archive for the ‘alphabet’ Category

the words don’t fit or the medium is the message

April 16, 2014

Photo by derfrankie • Instagram.

keep calm

April 12, 2014

I made these cards based on the now famous British World War poster “Keep Calm and Carry On”, which is in the public domain. You can read about the history here. Rip-offs have become something of a meme. Mail artist and brilliant typographer Keith Bates created the font, based on the original poster series.

keep calm and mail art

keep calm and mail art

love peace and mail art

love respect and mail art

love respect and mail art

please do not ever feed trolls

please do not ever feed trolls

 

 

The last one ‘please do not ever feed trolls’ may come in handy, when confronted with internet trolls appearing in internet forums. You are free to use it, whenever you feel the need.

rubber stamps and fonts by Keith Bates

April 11, 2014

Keith Bates – Rubber Stamp Mail Art. Keith Bates is a personal hero of mine. Not only is he a mail artist, but he makes beautiful fonts, including free ones, which I have been using. Check out the amazing type shop: http://www.k-type.com/

paper works by Joanne Hummel Newell

April 10, 2014

pocket-museum_pencil-watercolour-and-collage_51cmx51cmhyper-planepop-up-book_collageephemerapencil_40cmx30cmx20cmbird-and-eggs_paper-and-found-objects_2010_35x15x15cm

Nice  work  by Joanne Hummel Newell.

mail art letter by Nancy Bell Scott

April 4, 2014

 

Beautiful mail art by Nancy Bell Scott | The Letter Project.

writing on the wall

April 2, 2014

An interactive exhibition by Annie Albagli, held in the Commonwealth Gallery in the Fall of 2007 .

the forest of signs

April 1, 2014

found here: The Forest of Signs (Budding Artists – Detail) 2008.

The Forest of Signs (Apple Record) 2008 

The Forest of Signs (Brake) 2008 

 

mr printable

August 18, 2012

Printable Quotes Posters | Mr Printables.

Mr Printable offers a lovely range of mostly free (!) printable materials for children, flash cards, alphabet posters, maps. games, coloring pages, posters, paper dolls, and a small printable world to make out of paper. Very nicely designed and some very original ideas. I like these two posters too.

hand lettering

August 13, 2012

Getting Messy With Ms. Jessi.

Here is another creative project for children, creating illustrations fo all the letters of the alphabet, with handprints. The thumbnails are a bit small but if you click on the image they will enlarge a little bit more.

alphabeasties

August 9, 2012

E is for Elephant

O is for 

Great twist on the animal alphabet book.

type tales

August 7, 2012

In contrast to the previously posted rendition of Little Red Riding hood this one by  Lauren Kaiseris entirely done with stunningly expressive lettering.

summer snowflakes

August 6, 2012

How Do You Cut Your Snowflakes?.

I don’t know why I am posting about these winter themes in the middle of summer. Well, I guess I have had very little time for blogging this year and so there is a backlog. Anyway, this is a lovely idea for a simple project, cutting snowflakes out of junk mail by Michele Pacey.

more writing magic

October 14, 2011

by Arturo Carmassi via gramatologia 

love poem

October 14, 2011

by Marian Bantjes via  gramatologia: 

flat pack writing

September 26, 2011

 Some Ikea hack that is. IKEA Assembly Service found via S.Oliveros.

how to brighten up your walls

January 7, 2011

poster - how to brighten up your walls“How To Brighten Up Your Walls” Poster by Mike Arnold is a 16.5″ x 23.5″ screenprint, has an edition of 50, and is £15.

OMG Posters!

initials

April 9, 2010

Lovely initials to use for your blog can be found on The Daily Drop Cap – an ongoing project by typographer and illustrator Jessica Hische.

ШФЯD ДИD IMДGЗ

January 10, 2010

Having a little fun with faux Cyrillic in the headline, from the world of stuff.

type nesting

January 10, 2010

Dubi Kaufmann created a webiste on typenesting.tumblr.com showing images of birds nesting in letters. How sweet is that!

reading traces

November 25, 2009

“Writing, like human language, is engendered not only within the human community but between the human community and the animate landscape, born of the interplay and contact between the human and the more than human world. The earthly terrain in which we find ourselves, and upon which we depend from our nourishment, is shot through with suggestive scrawls and traces, from the sinuous calligraphy of rivers winding across the land, inscribing arroyos and canyons into the parched earth of the desert, to the black slash burned by lightning into the trunk of an old elm. The swooping flight of birds is a kind of cursive script written on the wind; it is this script that was studied by the ancient “augurs” who could read therein the course of the future. Leaf-miner insects make strange hieroglyphic tabloids of the leaves they consume. Wolves urinate on specific stumps and stones to mark off their territory. And today you read these printed words as tribal hunters once read the tracks of deer, moose, and bear printed in the soil of the forest floor. Archaeological evidence suggests that for more than one million years the subsistence of humankind has depended upon the acuity of such hunters, upon their ability to read the traces – a bit of scat here, broken twig there – of these animal Others. These letters I print across the page, the scratches and scrawls you now focus upon, trailing off across the white surface, are hardly different from the footprints of prey left in the snow. We read these traces with organs honed over millennia by our tribal ancestors moving instinctively from one track to the next, picking up the trail afresh whenever it leaves off, hunting the meaning, which would be the meeting with the Other.”

This is a quote from David Abram (1996) The Spell of the Sensuous. New York, Random House. To him the alphabet “is a strange and potent technology”.

cryptic messages

October 17, 2009

transkrypt.de

On Transcrypt.de by Frank Baranowski you can find a description for exercises in designing mysterious fonts, derived from known latin scripts, which do not mean anything,  see Kryptic 1 and Kryptic2.

Meanwhile I read on Popular Mechanics that the poster for Lost’s final season contains hieroglyphics. Dr. James Allen, Wilbour Professor of Egyptology and Chair of Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at Brown University analyzed the symbols and had this answer: “The hieroglyphs spell out two Egyptian words, meaning ‘Who is the guide?’ or ‘Who is the leader?”

lost_tv_poster_final_season_01

via educating alice


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